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The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

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Anil Malhotra, MD

Investigator, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Director, Psychiatry Research, Zucker Hillside Hospital

Professor, Molecular Medicine and Psychiatry, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine

Phone: (718) 470-8012
Email: malhotra@lij.edu

About the Investigator

Dr. Malhotra is the Director of Psychiatry Research at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, NY, Professor at the Department of Molecular Medicine and the Department of Psychiatry at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine in Hempstead, NY, and an investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, NY. Dr. Malhotra completed his undergraduate studies at Cornell University in 1985 and received his M.D. from Wake Forest University in 1989. After residency training in psychiatry at Georgetown University, he completed a research fellowship at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where he initiated a research program in pharmacogenetics. Following his tenure at NIMH, Dr. Malhotra moved to the Zucker Hillside Hospital and developed an internationally recognized molecular genetics program focused on the major neuropsychiatric disorders.

Dr. Malhotra is principal investigator of grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), NARSAD, and industry. He is a frequent speaker at international and national meetings, as well as giving numerous Grand Rounds presentations at academic institutions across the U.S. He is a member of Editorial Boards of several medical and scientific journals, participates in NIH study sections, and serves as the program chair for the only annual meeting dedicated to pharmacogenetics in psychiatry.

Research Focus

For decades, scientists at Zucker Hillside Hospital have been exploring every possible avenue to determine what causes schizophrenia and to test ways to treat the symptoms that alter the lives of one in every 100 people and their families. Dr. Anil Malhotra works on identifying the biological underpinnings of schizophrenia and is trying to determine how anti-psychotic drugs work to quell the symptoms of the disease.

Dr. Malhotra’s research group focuses on identifying the biological underpinnings of schizophrenia and the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. His group has identified a number of genes associated with increased risk for the disorder, determined their relationship with important clinical manifestations of illness, including cognitive impairment, and examined the role of genetic factors in predicting individual responses to pharmacological treatment.

Dr. Malhotra’s research group published the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia, as well as developed a new analytic strategy to assess these data. Moreover, a recent project provides new evidence for a role of specific genetic factors in vulnerability to antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain, a common yet potentially serious side effect of treatment.

Dr. Malhotra’s scientific investigators/collaborators:

Todd Lencz, PhD
Philip Szeszko, PhD
Pamela DeRosse, PhD

Education

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Degree: AB
1985
Field of Study: Pre-med

Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Degree: MD
1989
Field of Study: Medicine

Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C.
Degree: Resident
1992
Field of Study: Psychiatric Resident

National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, MD
Degree: Need degree here
1993
Field of Study: Clinical Associate

Awards & Honors

1993-1998 Senior Staff Fellow, Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Mental Health,
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
1996-1998 Chief, Unit of Pharmacogenetics, Experimental Therapeutics Branch, NIMH, NIH
1998-present Chief, Unit of Molecular Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital of the NS-LIJHS, Glen Oaks, NY
2001-2009 Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
2001-2004 Associate Director, Psychiatry Research, Zucker Hillside Hospital of the NS-LIJHS
2003-present Adjunct Associate Professor, Psychiatry, School of Medicine, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY
2004-present Director, Psychiatry Research, Zucker Hillside Hospital of the NS-LIJHS
2008-present Investigator, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
2008-present Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, NY
2009-present Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
2010-present Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine and Department of Psychiatry,
Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY

Publications
  1. DeRosse P, Funke B, Burdick KE, Lencz T, Goldberg TE, Kane JM, Kucherlapati R, Malhotra AK. “COMT genotype and manic symptoms in schizophrenia.” Schizophr Res 2006; 87:28-31.
  2. Burdick KE, Goldberg TE, Funke B, Bates, JA, Lencz T, Kucherlapati R, Malhotra AK. “DTNBP1 genotype influences cognitive decline in schizophrenia.” Schizophr Res 2007; 89:169-172
  3. Lencz T, Morgan TV, Athanasiou M, Dain B, Reed CR, Kane JM, Kucherlapati R, Malhotra AK. “Converging evidence for a psuedoautosomal cytokine receptor gene locus in schizophrenia.” Mol Psychiatry 2007; 12:572-580.
  4. DeRosse P, Hodgkinson CA, Lencz T, Burdick KE, Kane JM, Goldman D, Malhotra AK. “Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) genotype and positive symptoms in schizophrenia.” Biol Psychiatry 2007; 61:1208-1210.
  5. Burdick, KE, Funke B, Goldberg JF, Bates JA, Jaeger J, Kucherlapati R, Malhotra AK. “COMT genotype increases risk for bipolar I disorder and influences neurocognitive performance.” Bipolar Disor. 2007;9:370-6.
  6. Keefe RSE, Malhotra AK, Meltzer H, Kane JM, Buchanan RW, Murthy A, Sovel M, Li C, Goldman R. “Efficacy and safety of donepezil in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: Significant placebo /practice effects in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.” Neuropsychopharmacology 2008; 33:1217-1228.
  7. Goldberg TE, Goldman RS, Burdick KE, Malhotra AK, et al. “Cognitive improvements after treatment with second generation antipsychotic medications in first episode schizophrenia: Is it a practice effect.” Arch Gen Psychiatry 2007; 64:1115-1122.
  8. Lencz T, Lambert C, DeRosse P, Burdick, KE, Moran TV, Kane JM, Kucherlapati R, Malhotra AK. “Runs of homozygosity reveal highly penetrant recessive loci in schizophrenia.” PNAS 2007; 104:19942-19947. PMCID: PMC2148402
  9. Loftus ST, Garno JL, Jaeger J, Malhotra AK. “Temperament and character dimensions in bipolar I disorder: A comparison to healthy controls.” J Psychiatr Res 2008; 42:1131- 1136.
  10. Szeszko PR, Hodgkinson CA, Robinson DG, DeRosse P, Bilder RM, Lencz T, Burdick KE, Napolitano B, Betensky JD, Kane JM, Goldman D, Malhotra AK. “DISC1 is associated with prefrontal cortical gray matter and positive symptoms in schizophrenia.” Biol Psychol, 79:103-10, 2008. PMCID: PMC2623247

View more at PubMed