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Christoph U. Correll, MD

Medical Director, Recognition and Prevention Program (RAP) The Zucker Hillside Hospital

Professor, Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine

Investigator, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Phone: (718) 470-4812
Email: ccorrell@lij.edu

About the Investigator

Dr. Christoph U. Correll is a professor of psychiatry and molecular medicine at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine in New York. He is further the medical director of the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital, Queens, New York, and director of the Adverse Events Unit and the Core Laboratory Unit, each at the Zucker Hillside Hospital Advanced Center for Intervention and Services Research.

Dr. Correll completed his medical studies at both the Free University of Berlin, Germany, and Dundee University Medical School in Scotland. After finishing his general psychiatry residency, he also trained in child and adolescent psychiatry, both at The Zucker Hillside Hospital in Queens, New York.

Dr. Correll’s research and clinical work focus on the identification and treatment of patients with severe psychiatric disorders. His areas of expertise include schizophrenia-spectrum, mood-spectrum and aggressive-spectrum disorders, ranging from the prodrome to first episode, multi-episode and refractory illness patients. He is further an expert in the risk-benefit evaluation of psychotropic medications, including the interface between psychiatry and medicine and the assessment of comparative effectiveness, both in prospective studies and meta-analytic evaluations.

Dr. Correll has authored over 200 journal articles. He has served on a number of expert consensus panels, is a reviewer for over 70 peer-reviewed journals and an editorial board member of ten scientific journals. Dr. Correll is the principal investigator or Steering Committee member of several large, federally funded grants and has received over two dozen national and international research awards and fellowships for his work.

Research Focus

Dr. Correll’s research and clinical work focus on the identification, characterization and psychopharmacological management of adults and youth with severe psychiatric disorders. His areas of expertise include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other psychotic, mood and autism/disruptive behavior spectrum disorders, ranging from the prodrome to first episode, multi-episode and refractory illness patients. His work focuses further on the risk-benefit evaluation of psychotropic medications, including the interface between psychiatry and medicine and investigations of the extent and mechanisms of neuromotor and cardiometabolic adverse effects.

Dr. Correll and his team are conducting several studies on beneficial effects and side effects of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers; symptomatic, diagnostic and functional outcomes of youth with psychiatric problems and on clinical and biological risk factors and protective factors predicting outcomes. These research projects involve naturalistic and randomized treatment, controlled and observational studies.

SATIETY study (sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health): children and adolescents (age 4-19 years) who start clinically decided antipsychotic treatment are followed in an observational cohort study design to assess the risks and benefits of these medications under real world conditions. Effectiveness, adverse effects and clinical and biological predictors of these effects are studied.

IMPACT study (sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health): children and adolescents (age 8-19 years) who have gained significant amount of their body weight over the past 3 years on an antipsychotic and who are overweight are randomized to up to 6 months of open treatment of a) healthy lifestyle instruction alone or b) addition of metformin or c) a switch to a lower risk antipsychotic.

STRATEGY study: children and adolescents (age 10-19 years) who are either starting antipsychotic treatment for the first time ever, or who have gained at least 10% of their body weight over the past 12 months while treated with an antipsychotic are randomized to 3 months of open treatment of a) healthy lifestyle instruction alone or b) addition of metformin.

Adolescent Mood Disorder and Psychosis Study: children and adolescents (age 12-18 years) who have a clinical diagnosis of a mood or psychosis spectrum disorder are interviewed to comprehensively characterize their psychiatric problems and followed in an observational cohort design to assess symptomatic and functional outcomes over time.

Dr. Correll has authored or co-authored over 200 journal articles. He has served on several expert consensus panels on the use of antipsychotics across a range of psychiatric disorders, is a reviewer for over 70 peer-reviewed journals and an editorial board member of ten scientific journals. Dr. Correll is the principal investigator or Steering Committee member of several large, federally funded grants and has received over two dozen national and international research awards and fellowships for his work.

Education

Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Degree: MD
1993
Field of Study: Pre-Medicine & Medicine

Dundee University, Dundee, Great Britain
Degree: MD
1991
Field of Study: Medicine

Neurologische Klinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt, Germany
Degree: Resident
1997
Field of Study: Neurology Residency

PGY-1, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
Degree: Resident
1998
Field of Study: Psychiatry Residency

Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY
2001
Field of Study: Psychiatry Research Residency (Chief)

Schneider Children’s Hospital, New Hyde Park, NY
2003
Field of Study: Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow

Awards & Honors

2002 11th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Young Scientist Award; Peter Henderson, M.D., Memorial Paper Award; Clinical Research Methodology Workshop American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology Fellowship Award; APA/Lilly Resident Research Award; Seventh APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; ACAP Presidential Scholar Award

2003 AADPRT George Ginsberg Fellowship Award; American Federation for Medical Research Clinical Research 2003 Conference Travel Award; American Federation for Medical Research Henry Christian Award; APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; Clinical Research Methodology Workshop American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology Fellowship Award; John and Maxine Bendheim Fellowship Award for Research

2004 APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; AACAP Pilot Research Award; North Shore – Long Island Jewish Research Institute Faculty Research Award

2005 International Congress on Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award; First NIMH-sponsored Career Development Institute for BPD Fellowship Award; First Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Information Service 2004-2005 Promising New Investigators Award

2007 NARSAD Young Investigator Award

2013 John and Maxine Bendheim Fellowship Award for Research

Publications
  1. Carrión RE, McLaughlin D, Goldberg TE, Auther AM, Olvet D, Correll CU, Cornblatt BA. “Prediction of functional outcome in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis.” JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Nov 1;70(11):1133-42.

  2. Nitta M, Kishimoto T, Müller N, Weiser M, Davidson M, Kane JM, Correll CU. “Adjunctive use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for schizophrenia: a meta-analytic investigation of randomized controlled trials.” Schizophr Bull. 2013 Nov;39(6):1230-41.

  3. Zhang JP, Gallego J, Robinson D, Malhotra AK, Kane JM, Correll CU. “Efficacy and safety of individual second-generation vs first-generation antipsychotics in first episode schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.” Int J Neuropsychopharm. 2013 Jul;16(6):1205-18.

  4. Correll CU, Zhao Q, Carson WH, Marcus R, McQuade R, Forbes A, Mankoski R. “Validity of Early Antipsychotic Response to Aripiprazole in Adolescents with Schizophrenia and Its Predictive Value for Clinical Outcomes.” J Am AcadChild Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;52(7):689-698.

  5. Kishimoto T, Agarwal V, Kishi T, Leucht S, Kane JM, Correll CU. “Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention in Schizophrenia: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials of First-Generation and Second-Generation Antipsychotics.” Mol Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;18(1):53-66.

  6. Olfson M, Blanco C, Liu SM, Wang S, Correll CU. “National trends in the office-based treatment of children and adolescents, and adults with antipsychotics.” Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Dec 1;69(12):1247-56.

  7. Malhotra AK, Correll CU, Chowdhury NI, Müller DJ, Gregersen PK, Lee AT, TiwariAK, Kane JM, Fleischhacker WW, Kahn RS, Ophoff RA, Lieberman JA, Meltzer HY, Lencz T, Kennedy JL. “Association Between Common Variants Near the Melanocortin 4 Receptor Gene and Severe Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Weight Gain.” Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012;69(9):904-912.

  8. De Hert M, Detraux J, van Winkel R, Yu W, Correll CU. “Metabolic and cardiovascular adverse effects associated with antipsychotic drugs.” Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2011 Oct 18;8(2):114-26.

  9. Nielsen J, Skadhede S, Correll CU. “Antipsychotics Associated with the Development of Type 2 Diabetes in Antipsychotic-Naïve Schizophrenia Patients. Neuropsychopharmacology.” 2010 Aug;35(9):1997-2004.

  10. Correll CU, Manu P, Olshanskiy V, Napolitano B, Kane JM, MalhotraAK. “Cardiometabolic risk of atypical antipsychotics during first-time use in children and adolescents.” JAMA 2009, Oct 28;302(16): 1763-1771.

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