expand

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Empowering Imagination. Pioneering Discovery.
Print | Font Size ( + ) ( - ) | Bookmark | Email

David Eidelberg, MD

Investigator & Head, Susan and Leonard Feinstein Center for Neurosciences

Director, NIH Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research

Professor of Molecular Medicine and Neurology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine

Phone: (516) 562-2498
Email: david1@nshs.edu

About the Investigator

David Eidelberg, MD, is director of the Feinstein Center for Neurosciences and the NIH Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, NY. He is internationally recognized for his pioneering work using functional imaging to identify metabolic network abnormalities in brain disorders. This approach has provided unique insights into the circuit changes that underlie the manifestations of Parkinson’s disease and related movement disorders. Dr. Eidelberg’s work has led to the development of novel image-based methods for the assessment of disease progression, treatment responses and enhancements in the accuracy of clinical diagnosis.

Dr. Eidelberg received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. After completing residency training in neurology at the Harvard-Longwood Area Training Program, he pursued postdoctoral training as a Moseley Traveling Fellow at the National Hospital, Queen Square, in London, and at Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York.

Dr. Eidelberg moved to North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, NY, in 1988 to establish the functional imaging laboratory and the clinical movement disorders program. In 2001, he became the founding director of the Center for Neurosciences at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, where he is currently professor of neurology at Susan and Leonard Feinstein Center for Neurosciences.

Dr. Eidelberg has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and other funding sources, including the Fred Springer Award of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association. He is the author of over 350 scientific publications and has served on the editorial boards of Neurology (1996-2001), Movement Disorders (1999-2003), Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1999-present), Current Opinion in Neurology (2001-present), Clinical Neuroscience Research (Associate Editor, 2003-2007), Annals of Neurology (2006-present), and Molecular Imaging and Biology (Associate Editor, 2007-present). He also serves on the scientific advisory board of The Michael J. Fox Foundation (2004-present) and the Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia & Parkinson Foundation (2009-present), and is Scientific Director of The Thomas Hartman Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (2007-present).

Research Focus

Dr. Eidelberg directs a leading imaging research program in brain disease. His program is internationally recognized for developing novel imaging techniques to characterize and quantify neural circuits in neurodegenerative disorders and to study their modulation by using functional imaging with PET and fMRI.

Dr. Eidelberg and his colleagues have detected characteristic spatially distributed metabolic networks for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and other neurological conditions. The identification and quantification of these pathways is important for diagnosing disease and for assessing the extent of functional impairment with disease progression. This approach has also proved useful when including neuroprotective agents designed to modify the course of disease.

Abnormal brain circuitry in normal aging and Parkinson’s disease

Investigators in the Functional Brain Imaging Laboratory are mapping the functional/anatomical circuitry underlying motor performance and learning in healthy aging and Parkinson’s disease.

Causes of cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease

Investigators are elucidating the pathophysiology of certain types of cognitive dysfunction and mood disorder in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders.

Brain abnormalities in pre-manifesting carriers of genetic mutations for brain disease

Neuroscientists are using novel imaging methods to identify functional and anatomical abnormalities in the brains of individuals genetically at risk for brain diseases including Huntington’s disease, dystonia, and familial Parkinson’s disease.

Brain chemistry changes and treatment efficacy

Researchers are investigating the regulation of key neurotransmitters to understand how brain chemistry relates to network modulation and therapeutic outcome. Investigators are also using functional imaging techniques to quantify the central effects of levodopa as well as the time course of medication washout on brain function. Investigators are also utilizing network imaging techniques to shed light on mechanisms of treatment side effects (levodopa-induced dyskinesias) and novel therapies like gene therapy.

Natural history of neurological diseases

Researchers in the Center are involved in longitudinal studies of Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease to study the course of network changes over time and the relationship of these changes to other disease biomarkers.

Abnormal protein aggregation in neurodegenerative disease

Investigators are studying the time course of abnormal protein aggregation in Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. They are also examining the relationship of these changes to metabolic network activity and cognitive functioning in these disorders.

Multi-modal imaging of brain function

Physicists and neuroscientists in the Center have developed a novel algorithm based on anatomical information from MRI to correct for the effect of brain atrophy, one of the major obstacles to accurate PET measurements in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. A team of investigators is studying the impact of these structural changes on abnormal brain network activity in pre-manifesting mutation carriers for Huntington’s disease.

Collaborations within North Shore-LIJ Health System

The Center for Neurosciences maintains extensive active collaborations with the Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, the Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders, the Center for Translational Psychiatry and the Center for Patient-Oriented Research at The Feinstein Institute. Many investigators also are active as clinical specialists within the health system, with close interactions with the Departments of Medicine and Neurology.

Lab Members

Miklos Argyelan, MD
Research Scientist
Research: Dr. Argyelan uses PET and fMRI to study Parkinson’s disease patients. His recent projects focus on learning and on the regulatory mechanism of dopamine. He hopes to shed light on the circumstances under which L-dopa facilitates or impairs learning.
E-mail: margyela@nshs.edu

Matthew Bussa, MPH
Research Assistant
Research: Matthew Bussa’s research interests are in studying metabolic brain networks in Parkinson’s disease and related movement disorders.
E-mail: mbussa@nshs.edu

Maren Carbon-Carbon, PhD
Assistant Investigator
Research: Dr. Carbon-Correll’s focuses on the use of functional brain imaging to study mechanisms of disease in hereditary dystonia. In addition, she studies the effects of deep brain stimulation on learning in dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.
E-mail: mcarbon@nshs.edu

Vijay Dhawan, PhD
Associate Investigator
Research: Dr. Dhawan’s research focuses on the use of novel radiotracers in functional brain imaging and studies the alterations in brain dopaminergic system that occurs in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.
E-mail: vdhawan@nshs.edu

Andrew Feigin, MD
Associate Investigator
Research: Dr. Feigin’s research focuses on using state-of-the-art PET imaging methods to elucidate the mechanisms underlying current therapies for Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. This work has led to the use of imaging in studies of novel therapies (e.g. gene therapy for PD). Dr. Feigin is interested in utilizing imaging as a biomarker for neurodegenerative disorders in the preclinical phase of illness.
E-mail: afeigin@nshs.edu

Florian Holtbernd, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Research: Dr. Holtbernd’s research interests focus on microvascular changes associated with Parkinson’s disease and levodopa treatment.
E-mail: fholtbernd@nshs.edu

Ji Hyun Ko, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Research: Dr. Ko’s research interests focus on the cognitive deficits of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with special emphasis on intervention methods (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) and brain imaging analysis. He has also studied various radio-tracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) that investigate specific neurotransmitter systems, especially dopamine.
E-mail: jko1@nshs.edu

Yilong Ma, PhD
Associate Investigator
Research: Dr. Ma works on the development and application of brain imaging methodology in the study of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders.
E-mail: yma@nshs.edu

Paul Mattis, PhD
Assistant Investigator
Research: Dr. Mattis’ research focuses on the neuropsychology of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. He has a special interest in the relationship between cognitive functioning and metabolism brain networks.
E-mail: pmattis@nshs.edu

Martin Niethammer, MD, PhD
Assistant Investigator
Research: Dr. Niethammer’s research focuses on the use of neuroimaging in the investigation of Parkinson’s disease and Dystonia. the use of novel radiotracers in functional brain imaging and studies the alterations in brain dopaminergic system that occurs in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.
E-mail: mniethamme@nshs.edu

Shichun Peng, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Research: Dr. Peng’s research interests are in medical image processing and analysis with a focus on pattern recognition and multi-modality correlation.
E-mail: speng@nshs.edu

Wataru Sako, MD, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Research: Dr. Sako’s research interests are in the areas of molecular biology and deep brain stimulation (DBS) of basal ganglia disorders including dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.
E-mail: wsako@nshs.edu

An Vo, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Research: Dr. Vo’s research interests are in fMRI processing and analysis.
E-mail: apo@nshs.edu

Phoebe Spetsieris, PhD
Associate Investigator
Research: Dr. Spetsieris uses an integrated methodologies approach to develop a versatile PC based package (SCANVP) that has been widely used in multi-modal functional image data visualization and analysis.
E-mail: pspetsie@nshs.edu

Chris Chengke Tang, MD, PhD
Research Scientist Assistant Investigator
Research: Dr. Tang research focuses on studying metabolic brain networks related to motor and cognitive abnormalities in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease with hopes of identifying optimal imaging biomarkers.
E-mail: ctang@nshs.edu

Aziz Ulug, PhD
Associate Investigator
Research: Dr. Ulug’s research focuses on neuroimaging applications of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). He is also highly experienced in other functional applications of MRI such as fMRI and MRSI.
E-mail: aulug@nshs.edu

An Vo, PhD
Research Scientist
Research: Dr. Vo’s research interests are in fMRI processing and analysis.
E-mail: avo@nshs.edu

Patricia J. Allen
Research Assistant
Email: pallen2@nshs.edu

Yoon Young (Michelle) Choi
Research Assistant
Email: ychoi3@nshs.edu

Administration:

Toni Flanagan-Fitzpatrick, MS
Research Coordinator
Research: Toni Flanagan is a research coordinator who manages research studies involving Dystonia and Parkinson’s disease.
E-mail: tflanaga@nshs.edu

Loreta Quartarolo, BS
Research Coordinator
Research: Loreta Quartarolo is a research coordinator who manages research studies involving Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease.
E-mail: lquartar@nshs.edu

Christine Edwards
Administrative Director, Center for Neurosciences
Administrator, NIH Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease Research
Phone: (516) 562-1123
E-mail: cedwards@nshs.edu

Rosie Persaud
Administrative Assistant
Phone: (516) 562- 2498
E-mail: rpersaud@nshs.edu

Education

Columbia University, New York, NY
Degree: BA.
1977

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Degree: MD
1981

Appointments

Susan and Leonard Feinstein Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience
Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine
Scientific Advisory Board, Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research
Scientific Advisory Board, Bachmann-Strauss Foundation for Dystonia & Parkinson’s Disease

Publications
  1. Carbon M, Reetz K, Ghilardi MF, Dhawan V, Eidelberg D. “Early Parkinson’s disease: Longitudinal changes in brain activity during sequence learning.” Neurobiol Dis, 2010; 37(2)455-60 [PMCID: PMC2818462]
  2. Tang C, Poston K, Dhawan V, Eidelberg D. “Abnormalities in metabolic network activity precede the onset of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease.” J Neurosci, 2010; 30(3):1049-56 [PMCID: PMC2866050]
  3. Ma Y, Tang C, Chaly T, Greene P, Breeze R, Fahn S, Freed C, Dhawan V, Eidelberg D. “Dopamine cell implantation in Parkinson’s disease: long-term clinical and 18F-FDOPA PET outcomes.” J Nucl Med, 2010; 51:7-15 [PMCID: PMC2946843]
  4. Tang C, Poston K, Eckert T, Feigin A, Frucht S, Gudesblatt M, Dhawan V, Lesser M, Vonsattel J-P, Fahn S, Eidelberg D. “Differential diagnosis of parkinsonism: a metabolic imaging study using pattern analysis.” Lancet Neurol, 2010; 9(2):149-58 [NIHMS: 174570]
  5. Ma Y, Huang C, Dyke JP, Pan H, Feigin A, Eidelberg D. “Parkinson’s disease spatial covariance pattern: Non-invasive quantification with perfusion MRI.” J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 2010; 30(3):505-9 [PMCID: PMC2949137]
  6. Carbon M, Argyelan M, Habeck C, Ghilardi MF, Fitzpatrick T, Dhawan V, Pourfar M, Bressman SB, Eidelberg D. “Increased sensorimotor network activity in DYT1 dystonia: A functional imaging study.” Brain, 2010; 133(Pt 3):690-700
  7. Isaias IU, Marotta G, Hirano S, Canesi M, Benti R, Righini A, Cilia R, Pezzoli G, Eidelberg D, Antonini A. “Imaging essential tremor.” Mov Disord, 2010; 25(6):679-86
  8. Marinelli L, Perfetti B, Moisello C, Di Rocco A, Eidelberg D, Abbruzzese G, Ghilardi MF. “Increased reaction time predicts visual learning deficits in Parkinson’s disease.” Mov Disord, 2010; 25(10):1498-1501
  9. Spetsieris PG, Dhawan V, Eidelberg D. “Three-fold cross-validation of parkinsonian brain patterns.” Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc, 2010; 1:2906-2909

View more at PubMed