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The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

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Nadeen Chahine, PhD

Director of the Bioengineering-Biomechanics Laboratory and Assistant Investigator,
The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research 

Assistant Professor of Molecular Medicine and Neurosurgery, Hofstra North Shore LIJ Health System

Phone: (516) 562-2574
Email: nchahine@nshs.edu

About the Investigator
Dr. Nadeen Chahine is an assistant investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, assistant professor of Molecular Medicine and Neurosurgery, Hofstra North Shore LIJ Health System, and director of the Bioengineering-Biomechanics laboratory. She obtained her undergraduate degrees in Biomedical Engineering at Boston University (2000), and completed her PhD at Columbia University in the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Cellular Engineering laboratories under the direction of Dr. Gerard Ateshian and Dr. Clark Hung (2006).

After postdoctoral studies (2006-2008) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy) in micro/ nanotechnology as an Ernest Lawrence Fellow, Dr. Chahine developed a new bioengineering and biomechanics research program at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in New York.

Research Focus
Dr. Chahine’s research team focuses on degeneration and regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues, particularly intervertebral disc, articular cartilage and tendonous tissues. They use rigorous tools of bioengineering, cellular and molecular biology and animal physiology to characterize the function of healthy and diseased tissues. This approach is used to develop new treatment strategies for repairing arthritic and diseased musculoskeletal tissues using combinations of cells, biomaterials and chemical factors.

Her team’s research applies the tools of biomedical engineering to study and develop treatments for degenerate cartilaginous tissues in the musculoskeletal system. Specifically, their research is focused on the intervertebral disc in the spine, articular cartilage in the joints, and the Achilles tendon. These tissues play a pivotal role in load transmission during locomotion, and their ability to bear load changes with aging and degeneration.

The aim of Dr. Chahine’s research is two-fold: (1) Understand the role of inflammation in the etiology of injury and degeneration. (2) Design biological replacements of diseased cartilaginous tissues that can withstand the biomechanical and inflammatory environment after implantation. Her lab’s approach to this research utilizes hierarchical studies at the joint, tissue, cellular, and molecular level. The ultimate goal of studying the healthy function of tissues and cells is to develop treatments, and potentially cures, for degenerative diseases, such as disc disease and osteoarthritis.

Dr. Chahine’s lab hosts residents from the Departments of Neurosurgery and Orthopedic Surgery for research rotations. Dr. Chahine is an active member of the Bioengineering Division (BED) of the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS). She has successfully administered externally funded projects and collaborated with other internal and external researchers to produce several peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Chahine has a demonstrated record of early success and productive research projects in an area of high relevance to our aging population.

Lab Members

Quynhhoa (Hoa) T. Nguyen, PhD
Post Doctoral Fellow
Email: qnguyen@nshs.edu
Phone: (516) 562-2545
Hoa received her B.S. from the University of Utah in Biomedical Engineering in 2005. She then attended the University of California San Diego and received a MS and PhD in Bioengineering in 2007 and 2012, respectively (from the lab of Professor Robert Sah). She has previously worked in projects involving mechanobiology and biomechanics of articular cartilage repair. Her current project investigates the effect of inflammation on cell biomechanics and cell deformation in the intervertebral disc. Hoa is also researching the effects of MMP inhibition on tendon healing and tendon biomechanics.

Paula-lab-picturePaula A. Hernandez, PhD
Post Doctoral Fellow
Email: phernande2@nshs.edu
Phone: (516) 562-2534
Paula received her PhD in Molecular, Cell Biology and Neuroscience from the University of Chile in 2007. She has previously worked in projects involving Osteoclast differentiation (UConn) and Cartilage biology and repair (University of Cambridge). She is a cytoskeleton fan and her current project investigates the effect of inflammation, by TLR4 activation, on the architecture of the cytoskeleton in nucleus pulposus. The main goal is to study the relation between cytoskeleton changes and alterations in the biomechanical properties of these cells within the intervertebral discs, focusing in degenerative disc disease.

Kathryn (K.T.) Weber, MD
Clinical Research Fellow
Email: kweber2@nshs.edu
Phone: (516) 562-2541
Originally from Colorado, K.T. received her BA from Colby College, and her MD from Drexel University College of Medicine. She is currently a clinical fellow at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, investigating biomarkers and inflammatory responses in intervertebral disc disease. K.T.’s research encompasses IRB approved clinical studies, in collaboration with the Spine Division, Department of Neurosurgery, at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

Timothy Jacobsen, MEng
Research Assistant
Email: Tjacobsen@nshs.edu
Phone: (516) 562-2534
Timothy, a Long Island native, received his BS and MEng degrees in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate New York. He is currently a research assistant at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research where he previously worked as a summer intern. His current research involves investigating the response of the IVD to inflammation on a cellular level, and its role in the etiology of disc degeneration. In his spare time Timothy also volunteers for his local fire department and B.S.A. troop.

Shina_headshotShina Satoh, BS
Medical Student
Email: satoh.shina@gmail.com
Shina Satoh is a second year Medical Student at Hofstra North Shore – LIJ School of Medicine. She is currently interested in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and had the opportunity to explore this field through a summer research project. She investigated changes in pain and inflammatory cytokines due to epidural injections. She would like to continue exploring the field by integrating basis science and clinical research. Shina received her B.A. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University in 2012.

Education
Boston University
Degree: BS
2000
Field of Study: Biomedical Engineering

Columbia University
Degree: MS
2002
Field of Study: Cell & Tissue Engineering

Columbia University
Degree: M. Phil.
2006
Field of Study: Biomechanics/Bioengineering

Columbia University
Degree: PhD
2006
Field of Study: Biomechanics/Bioengineering

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Degree: Postdoc
2008
Field of Study: Micro & Nano Technology

Awards & Honors
1997 Student Leadership Award, Honored by Boston University Alumni
2000 Biomedical Engineering Graduate Research Assistantship (Columbia University)
2001 Annals of Biomedical Engineering Merit Award
2004 1st Place, Ph.D. Paper Competition, Bioengineering Division, Am. Society of Mechanical Engineering
2006 Leadership Development Forum, Bioengineering Div., Am. Soc. of Mechanical Eng., Amelia Island, FL
2006 Lawrence Post Doctoral Fellowship, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
2007 Leadership Development Forum, Bioengineering Div., Am. Soc. of Mechanical Eng., Keystone, CO
2007 National Academies Keck Futures Initiative on Aging, Newport, CA
2007 Feature Article, Nanotechnology Innovation; ‘Innovation’ Magazine, October/November
2011 Young Investigator Research Award Grant, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
2011 New Investigator Research Award Finalist, Orthopedic Research Society
2011 AOSpine Best Abstracts, Global Spine Congress, Barcelona, Spain
2012 National Science Foundation CAREER Award
2012 Jennifer & Bradley Marsh Early Career Development Award, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
2013 Rising Star Award, Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Conference, Biomedical Engineering Society
Publications
  1. Cummings S, Grande DA, Hee CK, Kestler HK, Roden CM, Razzano P, Dines DM, Chahine NO, Dines JS.  2012.  “Effect of rhPDGF-BB-Coated Sutures on Tendon Healing in a Rat Model: A Histological and Biomechanical Study.”  Journal of Tissue Engineering, 3(1).
  2. O’Connell G.D., Lima EG, Bian L, Chahine NO, Albro M, Cook JL, Ateshian GA, Hung CT, 2012. “Toward Engineering a Biological Joint Replacement.”  Journal of Knee Surgery.  25(3):187-96.
  3. Maidhof R, Alipui DA, Rafuiddin A, Levine M, Grande DA, Chahine NO, 2012, “Emerging Trends in Biological Therapy for Intervertebral Disc Disease.” Discovery Health, Invited Review.  14(79):401-11.
  4. Shah V, Bendele A, Kestler HK, Hollinger JO, Chahine NO, Hee CK.  2013.  “Dose-Response Effect of an Intra-Tendon Application of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) in a Rat Achilles Tendinopathy Model.”  Journal of Orthopedic Research. 31(3):413-20.
  5. Rajan N, Bloom O, Stetson N, Sherry B, Levine M, Chahine NO, 2013, “Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression and Stimulation in a Model of Intervertebral Disc Inflammation and Degeneration.”  Spine. 38(16):1343-51.
  6. Chahine NO, Blanchette C, Thomas C, Lu J, Haudenschild G, Loots GG, 2013, “Effect of age and cytoskeletal elements on the indentation-dependent mechanical stiffness of chondrocytes.” PLOS One, 8(4):e61651.
  7. Grande, DA, Schwartz, JA, Brandel E, Chahine NO, Sgaglione N, 2013, “Articular Cartilage Repair: Where We Have Been, Where We Are Now, and Where We Are Headed.” Cartilage. 4(4):281-285.
  8. Kessler MW, Barr J, Greenwald R, Lane LB, Dines JS, Dines DM, Drakos MC, Grande DA*, Chahine NO*, “Enhancement of Achilles Tendon Repair Mediated by Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition Via Systemic Administration of Doxycycline”, Journal of Orthopedic Research, 32(4):500-6.
  9. Chahine NO, Collette NM, Thompson H, Loots, GG, “Biocompatibility of Hydrogel-Carbon Nanotubes Composites for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering.” Tissue Engineering Part A, In Press.
  10. Maidhof, R; Jacobson, T; Papatheodorou, A; Chahine NO, 2014.  “Effect of Inflammation on the Osmotic Properties of Nucleus Pulposus Cells. PLOS One, 9(6):e99621.
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