Christoph U. Correll, MD

Medical Director, Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program,
Department of Psychiatry, The Zucker Hillside Hospital

Investigator, Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Professor, Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine

Phone: (718) 470-4812
Email: ccorrell@northwell.edu

About the Investigator
Christoph Correll, MD, is currently professor of psychiatry and molecular medicine at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and medical director of the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. He completed his medical studies at the Free University of Berlin in Germany and Dundee University Medical School in Scotland. After finishing his general psychiatry residency at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, New York, he trained in child and adolescent psychiatry at Schneider Children’s Hospital in New Hyde Park, New York.

Dr. Correll’s research and clinical work focus on the identification, characterization, and treatment of adults and youths with severe psychiatric disorders. His areas of expertise include the prodrome, first episode, multi-episode, and refractory illness phase of severe psychotic and mood disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression, as well as aggressive spectrum disorders. He further focuses on psychopharmacology and comparative effectiveness, the risk–benefit evaluation of psychotropic medications, as well as the extent and mechanisms of cardiometabolic and neuromotor adverse effects.

Dr. Correll has authored or co-authored more than 400 journal articles and has served on several expert consensus panels on the use of antipsychotics across a range of psychiatric disorders. He is a reviewer for more than 70 peer-reviewed journals and an editorial board member of 12 scientific journals. Dr. Correll is the principal investigator or Steering Committee member of several large, federally funded grants. He has received more than 30 national and international research awards and fellowships for his work, and he was listed by Thomson Reuters both in 2014 and 2015 as one of “the most influential scientific minds” and “top 1% cited scientists in the area of psychiatry.”

Research Focus

Dr. Correll’s research and clinical work focus on the identification, characterization and psychopharmacological management of adults and youth with severe psychiatric disorders. His areas of expertise include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other psychotic, mood and autism/disruptive behavior spectrum disorders, ranging from the prodrome to first episode, multi-episode and refractory illness patients. His work focuses further on the risk-benefit evaluation of psychotropic medications, including the interface between psychiatry and medicine and investigations of the extent and mechanisms of neuromotor and cardiometabolic adverse effects.

Dr. Correll and his team are conducting several studies on beneficial effects and side effects of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers; symptomatic, diagnostic and functional outcomes of youth with psychiatric problems and on clinical and biological risk factors and protective factors predicting outcomes. These research projects involve naturalistic and randomized treatment, controlled and observational studies.

SATIETY study (sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health): children and adolescents (age 4-19 years) who start clinically decided antipsychotic treatment are followed in an observational cohort study design to assess the risks and benefits of these medications under real world conditions. Effectiveness, adverse effects and clinical and biological predictors of these effects are studied.

Adolescent Mood Disorder and Psychosis Study: children and adolescents (age 12-18 years) who have a clinical diagnosis of a mood or psychosis spectrum disorder are interviewed to comprehensively characterize their psychiatric problems and followed in an observational cohort design to assess symptomatic and functional outcomes over time.

Fluoxetine versus Aripiprazole Comparative Trial (FACT): Youth (aged 12-25 years) fulfilling criteria for being at “high-risk” for psychosis are randomized in a double blind fashion to 6-months of treatment with either the antidepressant fluoxetine or the partial D2 agonist antipsychotic aripiprazole. Efficacy for symptoms, stability, adverse effects are studied.

Adjunctive Vortioxetine in Schizophrenia (AVIS): stable adults (age 18-65 years) diagnosed with schizophrenia who have predominant negative symptoms are randomized in a double blind fashion to 4-months add-on vortioxetine, a marketed new-generation antidepressant, or placebo, while keeping all other treatment stable. Efficacy for negative symptoms cognition, other symptoms and adverse effects are studied.

MOBILITY – Metformin for Overweight & OBese ChILdren and Adolescents with BIpolar Spectrum Disorders Treated with Second-Generation AntipsYchotics (sponsor: Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)): A multisite real-world, large pragmatic trial in which 1800 children and adolescents (age 8-17 years) with a lifetime history of a bipolar-spectrum diagnosis who are overweight or obese and treated with a second-generation antipsychotic are randomized to 2 years of open treatment with usual care and healthy lifestyle instruction or usual care and healthy lifestyle instruction plus metformin. Developmentally adjusted body mass index, patient centered outcomes in patietns and family members as well as symptoms and adverse effects are assessed.

Dr. Correll has authored or co-authored over 400 journal articles. He has served on several expert consensus panels on the use of antipsychotics across a range of psychiatric disorders, is a reviewer for over 70 peer-reviewed journals and an editorial board member of 12 scientific journals. Dr. Correll is the principal investigator or Steering Committee member of several large, federally funded grants and has received over 30 national and international research awards and fellowships for his work.

Education

Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Degree: MD
1993
Field of Study: Pre-Medicine & Medicine

Dundee University, Dundee, Great Britain
Degree: MD
1991
Field of Study: Medicine

Neurologische Klinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt, Germany
Degree: Resident
1997
Field of Study: Neurology Residency

PGY-1, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
Degree: Resident
1998
Field of Study: Psychiatry Residency

Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY
2001
Field of Study: Psychiatry Research Residency (Chief)

Schneider Children’s Hospital, New Hyde Park, NY
2003
Field of Study: Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow

Awards & Honors

2015 Listing by Thomson Reuters as one of “The most influential scientific minds 2015” and “top 1% cited scientists in the area of psychiatry”; International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Best Paper Award – 1st place for the best paper published in the journal Bipolar Disorders in 2015

2014 Listing by Thomson Reuters as one of “The most influential scientific minds 2014” and “top 1% cited scientists in the area of psychiatry”; American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) Outstanding Mentor Award

2013 John and Maxine Bendheim Fellowship Award for Research

2007 NARSAD Young Investigator Award

2005 International Congress on Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award; First NIMH-sponsored Career Development Institute for BPD Fellowship Award; First Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Information Service 2004-2005 Promising New Investigators Award

2004 APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; AACAP Pilot Research Award; Northwell Health Research Institute Faculty Research Award

2003 AADPRT George Ginsberg Fellowship Award; American Federation for Medical Research Clinical Research 2003 Conference Travel Award; American Federation for Medical Research Henry Christian Award; APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; Clinical Research Methodology Workshop American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology Fellowship Award; John and Maxine Bendheim Fellowship Award for Research

2002 11th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Young Scientist Award; Peter Henderson, M.D., Memorial Paper Award; Clinical Research Methodology Workshop American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology Fellowship Award; APA/Lilly Resident Research Award; Seventh APA Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators Award; ACAP Presidential Scholar Award

Publications
  1. Galling B, Roldán A, Nielsen RE, Nielsen J, Gerhard T, Carbon M, Stubbs B, Vancampfort D, De Hert M, Olfson M, Kahl KG, Martin A, Guo JJ, Lane HY, Sung FC, Liao CH, Arango C, Correll CU. “Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth Exposed to Antipsychotics: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.” JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Mar 1;73(3):247-59.
  2. Cornblatt BA, Carrión RE, Auther A, McLaughlin D, Olsen RH, John M, Correll CU. “Psychosis Prevention: A Modified Clinical High Risk Perspective From the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program.” Am J Psychiatry. 2015 Oct 1;172(10):986-4.
  3. Correll CU, Skuban A, Ouyang J, Hobart M, Pfister S, McQuade RD, Nyilas M, Carson WH, Sanchez R, Eriksson H. “Efficacy and Safety of Brexpiprazole for the Treatment of Acute Schizophrenia: A 6-Week Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Am J Psychiatry. 2015 Sep 1;172(9):870-880.
  4. Correll CU, Detraux J, De Lepeleire J, De Hert M. “Effects of antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers on risk for physical diseases in people with schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder.” World Psychiatry. 2015 Jun;14(2):119-136.
  5. Correll CU, Robinson DG, Schooler NR, Brunette MF, Mueser KT, Rosenheck RA, Marcy P, Addington J, Estroff SE, Robinson J, Penn D, Azrin S, Goldstein A, Severe J, Heinssen R, Kane JM. “Cardiometabolic Risk in First Episode Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorder Patients: Baseline Results from the RAISE-ETP Study.” JAMA Psychiatry 2014 Dec 1;71(12):1350-63.
  6. Correll CU, Olvet D, Auther A, Hauser M, Kishimoto T, Synder S, Carrión RE, Cornblatt BA. “The Bipolar Prodrome Symptom Interview and Scale-Prospective (BPSS-P): Description and Validation in a Clinical High Risk Psychiatric Sample and Healthy Controls.” Bipolar Disord. 2014 Aug;16(5):505-22.
  7. Olfson M, Blanco C, Wang S, Laje G, Correll CU.  “National Trends in the Mental Health Care of Children and Adolescents by Office-Based Physicians.” JAMA Psychiatry. 2014 Jan 1;71(1):81-90.
  8. Kishimoto T, Agarwal V, Kishi T, Leucht S, Kane JM, Correll CU. “Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention in Schizophrenia: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials of First-Generation and Second-Generation Antipsychotics.” Mol Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;18(1):53-66.
  9. De Hert M, Detraux J, van Winkel R, Yu W, Correll CU. “Metabolic and cardiovascular adverse effects associated with antipsychotic drugs.” Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2011 Oct 18;8(2):114-26.
  10. Correll CU, Manu P, Olshanskiy V, Napolitano B, Kane JM, Malhotra AK. “Cardiometabolic risk of atypical antipsychotics during first-time use in children and adolescents.” JAMA 2009, Oct 28;302(16): 1763-1771.

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