Gloria Y.F. Ho, PhD

Chief, Epidemiology and Research, Northwell Health

Professor, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine

Phone: (516) 465-3019
Email: gho1@northwell.edu

About the Investigator

Dr. Gloria Ho, MPH, PhD, is the Chief of Epidemiology in the Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention in Northwell Health and a Professor at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine. Dr. Ho received her MPH degree from Columbia University School of Public Health in 1982 and PhD degree in Epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in 1990. From 1990 to 2015, Dr. Ho was a faculty member in the Department of Epidemiology & Population Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, and became a full Professor in 2003. She is currently an Adjunct Clinical Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She moved to Northwell Health in 2015 and serves as Professor and Chief of Epidemiology.

Dr. Ho is a cancer epidemiologist. Her early research work focused on the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical dysplasia; she published the seminal papers that showed HPV infections were mostly transient rather than chronic as commonly believed. In the last 10 years, Dr. Ho studied the role of inflammation in cancer etiology and whether inflammation provided a mechanistic link between obesity and cancer. Specifically, she examined how circulating levels of adipokines, cytokines, and soluble cytokine receptors were associated with cancer risk. In some of these studies, she also examined inflammation at the genetic level, particularly polymorphisms in genes involved in cytokine signaling. Her most recent research interests involve studying the potential of circulating miRNA and circulating tumor DNA as early detection and prognostic biomarkers for cancers. She collaborates with investigators in Northwell Health to develop a population-based epidemiological research program.

Research Focus

Dr. Ho’s early research work focused on the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical dysplasia; she published the seminal papers that showed HPV infections were mostly transient rather than chronic as commonly believed. In the last 10 years, Dr. Ho studied the role of inflammation in cancer etiology and whether inflammation provided a mechanistic link between obesity and cancer. Specifically, she examined how circulating levels of adipokines, cytokines, and soluble cytokine receptors were associated with cancer risk. In some of these studies, she also examined inflammation at the genetic level, particularly polymorphisms in genes involved in cytokine signaling. Her most recent research interests involve studying the potential of circulating miRNA and circulating tumor DNA as early detection and prognostic biomarkers for cancers. Her work has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Education

University of Toronto
Degree: BS
1980
Field of Study: Microbiology

Columbia University, School of Public Health
Degree: MPH
1982
Field of Study: Epidemiology

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Degree: PhD
1990
Field of Study: Epidemiology

Awards and Honors

2008 Teacher of the Year, M.Sc. Clinical Research Training Program, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
1995-1997 American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award

Publications
  1. Ho GYF, Burk RD, Klein S, Kadish AS, Chang CJ, Palan P, Basu J, Tachezy R, Lewis R, Romney S: “Persistent genital human papillomavirus infection as a risk factor for persistent cervical dysplasia.” J Natl Cancer Inst 87:1365-71,1995.
  2. Ho GYF, Bierman R, Beardsley L, Chang CJ, Burk RD: “Natural history of cervicovaginal papillomavirus infection in young women.” New Engl J Med 338:423-8, 1998.
  3. Ho GYF, Bailey-Wilson JE: “The transmission/disequilibrium test for linkage on the X chromosome.” Am J Hum Genet 66:1158-60,2000. PMCID: PMC1288152
  4. Ho GYF, Xue X, Cushman M, McKeown-Eyssen G, Sandler RS, Ahnen DJ, Barry EL, Saibil F, Bresalier RS, Rohan TE, Baron JA: “Antagonistic effects of aspirin and folic acid on inflammation markers and subsequent risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas.” J Natl Cancer Inst 101:1650-4,2009. PMCID: PMC2786916
  5. Wang T, Rohan TE, Gunter MJ, Xue X, Wactawski-Wende J, Rajpathak SN, Cushman M, Strickler HD, Kaplan RC, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Scherer PE, Ho GYF: “A prospective study of inflammation markers and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal hormone nonusers.” Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 20:971-7,2011. PMCID: PMC3096873
  6. Ho GYF, Wang T, Gunter MJ, Strickler HD, Cushman M, Kaplan RC, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Xue X, Rajpathak SN, Chlebowski RT, Vitolins MZ, Scherer PE, Rohan TE: “Adipokines linking obesity with colorectal cancer risk in postmenopausal women.” Ca Res 72(12):3029-37,2012. PMCID: PMC379026
  7. Ho GYF, Wang T, Zheng SL, Tinker L, Xu J, Rohan TE, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Xue X, Augenlicht LH, Peters U, Phipps AI, Strickler HD, Gunter MJ, Cushman M: “Circulating soluble cytokine receptors and colorectal cancer risk.” Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23(1):179-88,2014. PMCID: PMC3947182
  8. Ho GYF, Jung HJ, Schoen RE, Wang T, Lin J, Williams Z, Weissfeld JL, Park JY, Loudig O, Suh Y: “Differential expression of circulating miRNAs according to severity of colorectal neoplasia.” Transl Res 166:225-32,2015. PMCID: PMC4537819
  9. Gunter MJ, Wang T, Cushman M, Xue X, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Strickler HD, Rohan TE, Manson JE, McTiernan A, Kaplan RC, Scherer PE, Chlebowski RT, Snetselaar L, Wang D, Ho GYF: “Circulating adipokines and inflammatory markers and postmenopausal breast cancer risk.” J Natl Ca Inst 107(9): djv169,2015.
  10. Ho GYF, Zheng SL, Cushman M, Perez-Soler R, Kim M, Xue X, Wang T, Schlecht NF, Tinker L, Rohan TE, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Wallace R, Chen C, Xu J, Yu H: “Associations of insulin and IGFBP-3 with lung cancer susceptibility in current smokers.” J Natl Ca Inst (In press), 2016.

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